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Listing Actions

Listing Actions and Species Evaluation Requests

The Commission updated the management system for conserving threatened species in September 2010. The system includes a process for accepting listing action requests from the public for species that may be at risk of extinction.

People requesting the Commission list or remove a species from the state-designated Threatened species list must follow the listing process.

Below are species for which the FWC has received petitions since 1999. Please click the links below to find out more regarding the current status of each.

Completed Listing Actions

Fox Squirrel

Current status is delisted. 

The Southern Fox Squirrel was previously classified as Sherman's Fox Squirrel. 

This species is included in Florida's Imperiled Species Management Plan, which guides conservation for Florida's state-listed and recently delisted fish and wildlife.

 

Southern Fox Squirrel Species Profile 

Biological Status Review

 

Current status is delisted.

This species is included in Florida's Imperiled Species Management Plan, which guides conservation for Florida's state-listed and recently delisted fish and wildlife. 

Homosassa Shrew Species Profile

Biological Status Review

harlequin darter

Current status is de-listed. 

Biological Status Review

Two ospreys perched on a branch

The current status is delisted. 

This species is included in Florida's Imperiled Species Management Plan, which guides conservation for Florida's state-listed and recently delisted fish and wildlife.

Osprey Species Profile

Biological Status Report

alligator snapping turtle

Current status is delisted.

This species is included in Florida's Imperiled Species Management Plan, which guides conservation for Florida's state-listed and recently delisted fish and wildlife.

Alligator Snapping Turtle Species Profile 

Biological Status Review

Current status is Federally Endangered.

The FWC received a request to evaluate the Miami tiger beetle in 2015. The FWC convened a Biological Review Group to further evaluate whether or not the species met criteria to warrant state-Threatened status.  During this time, the species was also being reviewed for listing under the Federal Endangered Species Act.  The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service determined that the Miami tiger beetle should receive endangered species status under the Act, and this protection became effective November 4th, 2016.

USFWS Species Profile

Petition Status - Complete. Does not warrant listing

The FWC received a petition to add the Smooth-billed ani to the list of Endangered, Threatened and Species of Special Concern in 2005.  Following the guidance of rule 68A-27.0012, this petition was reviewed for completeness in the summer of 2005.  The original petition was returned to the petitioner with deficiencies clearly indicated.  A revised petition was submitted, and found to be complete.  All complete petitions and ongoing listing actions were discussed and prioritized for action at the February 2007 Commission meeting. The work plan for 2007-08 presented to Commission recommended deferring action on the ani petition until the Commission takes final action on the peregrine falcon petition.  The Commission approved recommendation.  In December 2007, the Commission directed staff to review the listing process and for all petitions (other than the bald eagle and peregrine falcon) to be worked on after the review was complete. In September 2010, the Commission approved revised listing rules which included a moratorium for two years after the effective date of the rule on new requests for listing or delisting. The revised listing rules became effective in November 2010. The Smooth-billed ani petition remained active but was on hold until the two year moratorium was lifted.

In 2016, staff reviewed the petition and conducted a biological vulnerability screening, per Rule 68A-27.0012, F.A.C.  The biological vulnerability screening assigns a biological score for thebiological variables as described in Millsap, B.A., J.A. Gore, D.E. Runde, and S.I. Cerulean. 1990. Setting Priorities for the Conservation of Fish and Wildlife Species in Florida. Wildlife Monographs 111, and as subsequently modified.  The biological score for the smooth billed ani is 14.7, well below the cutoff for further evaluation.

The smooth billed ani is at the edge of its range in Florida and has undergone expansion and subsequent contraction in the state over the past century.  The species has a large global population (over 20 million) and an extensive global range; current research indicates that there is movement between the Cuban and south Florida populations. The full literature review is included below.

Petition 

Literature Review 

close up of gopher tortoise

Regular prescribed burning maintains gopher tortoise habitat.

Current status is State-designated Threatened in the state of Florida.

The FWC received a petition to re-evaluate the status of the gopher tortoise in 2002.  A team of scientists completed the biological status review in 2006 after a new listing process was implemented.  In 2006, FWC Commissioners agreed that reclassification of the gopher tortoise from Species of Special Concern to Threatened was warranted, and directed staff to work with stakeholders in creating a new management plan for the gopher tortoise.  The drafting process included extensive public involvement as stakeholders worked with FWC staff to finalize the gopher tortoise management plan.  The plan was approved by the Commission at the September 2007 Commission meeting in St. Petersburg, and the gopher tortoise was reclassified as Threatened. 

In 2010, the Commission approved new rules for listing imperiled species and the gopher tortoise was listed as State-designated Threatened in Florida.

The gopher tortoise management plan is available for download on the Gopher Tortoise Website.

More information on our Listing Process and biological status reviews for other species is available on our website. Below are links to the original petition of 2002 and the Gopher Tortoise Biological Status Report.

Petition 

Biological Status Report 

Management Plan (Revised 2012)

Gopher Tortoise Listing FAQs 

Commission Presentation 

Miami Blue Butterfly

The current status is State-designated Threatened.

The FWC received an emergency petition to add the Miami blue butterfly to the list of imperiled species in 2002.  The butterfly was evaluated according to the listing process rules and it was determined the species warranted listing as Endangered.

The butterfly was emergency-listed in 2002, affording it the protections provided under the Endangered Species rule.  Final action was taken in 2003, with the Miami blue butterfly added to the list of imperiled species as Endangered.

In 2002 the butterfly, which once ranged from Hillsborough County on the west coast down to the Keys and up to Volusia County on the east coast, was known to occur only at Bahia Honda State Park in the Keys.  In 2006 biologists discovered a second population in Key West National Wildlife Refuge.

The McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity at the University of Florida, with funding from the FWC and other sources, has been successful in breeding the Miami blue in captivity.  Releases of captive-bred butterflies into the wild have not fared well thus far, but expanded research is underway to learn how to do successful reintroductions.

The revised Miami Blue Management Plan was approved by the Commission at the June 2010 Commission Meeting held in Lake Mary, Florida.  The agenda for the meeting, to which the public was invited, can be found online.  The agenda provides specific links to the supporting documents for each agenda topic.

After the Commission adopted new rules for listing imperiled species in September 2010, the Miami blue butterfly became State-designated Threatened.

Miami blue butterfly Species Profile

Revised Miami Blue Butterfly Management Plan (Draft)

WMA Lochloosa Eagle

Current status is delisted

The FWC received a petition to re-evaluate the status of the bald eagle in 2002. A biological assessment following the listing process rules was initiated. However, a listing moratorium was initiated in 2003 and the listing process rules were changed in April 2005. Following the new process, a biological status report was completed, reviewed by independent peer reviewers, and presented to the Commission at the June 2006 Commission meeting. The Commission agreed that delisting the bald eagle from its current status as a Threatened species was warranted.

Public comment was sought and incorporated on a draft and again on a revised draft management plan. The revised draft plan was given conceptual approval by the Commission at its Sept. 12, 2007 meeting. The final bald eagle management plan was approved by the Commission at the April 2008 meeting in Tallahassee. The de-listing was effective 30 days after the Commission meeting.  Links to the biological status report and the final management plan are below.

Petition 

Biological Status Report 

Bald Eagle Management Plan 

Bald Eagle Listing FAQs 

Current Status is Federally Endangered.

The FWC received a petition to re-evaluate the Red-cockaded Woodpecker in 2001.  The woodpecker was evaluated according to the listing process rules and it was determined that the status change from a Threatened species to one of Special Concern was warranted.  In 2003, FWC reclassified the RCW as a "species of special concern," meaning it still is at high risk of extinction. In 2010, the Commission approved new rules for listing imperiled species and the RCW was listed as Federally endangered in Florida. Below are links to the species profile, the final biological status report, and a copy of the approved management plan.

Red-cockaded Woodpecker Species Profile 

USFWS Recovery Plan 

Management Plan 

Current status is Federally endangered (Reticulated flatwoods salamander) or Federally threatened (Frosted flatwoods salamander)

The FWC received a petition to add the flatwoods salamander to the list of Endangered, Threatened, and Species of Special Concern in 1999.  The salamander was evaluated according to the listing process rules and it was determined addition to the Species of Special Concern List was warranted.  Final action was taken in 2001 and the Flatwoods salamander was added to the Endangered, Threatened, and Species of Special Concern List as a Species of Special Concern.  In 2009, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officially subdivided the flatwoods salamander into two species.  Flatwoods salamanders in the population west of the Apalachicola River are now reticulated flatwoods salamanders (Federally endangered) and populations to the east are now frosted flatwoods salamanders (Federally threatened).  After the Commission adopted new rules for listing imperiled species in September 2010, both flatwoods salamander species were listed in Florida by their Federal designation. Below are links to the petition that was received in 1999, the final biological status report, and a copy of the approved management plan.

Petition

Final Biological Status Report

Management Plan

Current status is delisted

The FWC received a petition to re-evaluate the status of the Peregrine Falcon in 1999. The Commission approved membership of the Peregrine Falcon Biological Review Panel (BRP) in June 2007. The BRP met in December 2007 to conduct the biological assessment of the peregrine by evaluating species-specific data against the listing criteria found in Rule 68A-1.004, F.A.C. A biological status report was completed, reviewed by independent peer reviewers, and presented to the Commission at the June 2008 meeting. The Commission agreed that removing the peregrine falcon from Florida's imperiled species list is warranted.

FWC staff drafted a management plan and solicited public comment. This public comment period closed on April 15, 2009. The initial public hearing on the draft plan was held at the Commission meeting in Tallahassee on April 15. At the meeting, the Commission discussed and approved the plan in concept. The final peregrine falcon management plan was approved by the Commission at the June 17, 2009 meeting in Crystal River. The de-listing was effective 30 days after the Commission meeting.

Below are links to the final management plan, the biological status report, and the FAQs.

Final Management Plan

Biological Status Report

Peregrine Falcon Presentation

Current status is delisted.

The FWC received a petition to reclassify the Common Snook in 1999.  The snook was evaluated according to the listing process rules and it was determined removal from the Species of Special Concern List was warranted. Final action was taken in 2001 and the Common Snook was removed from the Endangered, Threatened, and Species of Special Concern List.  Below are links to the petition that was received in 1999, the final biological status report, and a copy of the 2000 stock assessment that was used as the species-specific management plan.

Petition 

2000 Stock Assessment 

Active Listing Actions

The FWC received a species evaluation request for the American Flamingo in 2018. Agency staff evaluated the request for completeness and conducted a biological vulnerability screening. Pending Commission approval, a Biological Review Group will be convened to review the species' status. The expected time of completion for this review is in 2020.

PCC

Current status remains a Species of Special Concern in Florida as the management plan is developed.

The FWC received two petitions to re-evaluate the status of the Panama City crayfish.  The petitions were received in 2001 and 2003, respectively.  In fulfillment of the 2001 petition, a biological assessment following the listing process rules was initiated.  However, a listing moratorium was initiated in 2003 and the listing process rules were changed in April 2005. Following the new process, a biological status report was completed, reviewed by independent peer reviewers, and presented to the Commission at the June 2006 Commission meeting.  The Commission agreed that reclassification of the Panama City crayfish from Species of Special Concern to Threatened is warranted; however the reclassification will not occur until a management plan for the species is approved.  Public comment was sought and incorporated in a revised draft management plan.  This draft plan, dated May 2007, was scheduled to be finalized and presented for approval at the February 2008 Commission meeting held in Panama City.  However, at the December 2007 Commission meeting, FWC staff were directed to revise the listing process and halt current listing actions, including finalization of the draft revised Panama City crayfish management plan.  In 2010, the Commission approved new rules for listing imperiled species and the Panama City crayfish remained listed as a Species of Special Concern in Florida.  Staff had already completed a biological status review of the Panama City crayfish in 2006; a link to its Biological Status Report is below. Staff have developed a draft management plan for the Panama City Crayfish, and continue to cooridaintae with stakeholders and partners to finalize the plan.

Draft Management Plan for Panama City Crayfish

Please view our Listing Process for more information on the listing process moratorium and changes.  Below is a link to the petitions received in 2001 and 2003 and the Biological Status Report.

Received in 2001 

Received in 2003 

Biological Status Report