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Habitat Management

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) has a management interest in approximately 5 million acres of natural resource land in Florida. Lands within the FWC managed-areas system are comprised of both private lands and those under the jurisdiction of various government agencies. Learn more about FWC’s habitat management efforts.

The state of Florida includes an incredible variety of habitats, including the tropical coral reefs of the Florida Keys, the unique Everglades, temperate hardwood forests, majestic rivers that meander for hundreds of miles, awe-inspiring springs, and nearly 8,000 lakes. These highly productive ecosystems support fishing and hunting, nature viewing, and other recreational and commercial activities.

FWC’s State Wildlife Action Plan is a comprehensive, statewide plan for conserving the state's wildlife and vital natural areas for future generations. It outlines what native wildlife and habitats are in need, why they are in need and, most importantly, what we are going to do about it. Some of the ecosystems included are: Hard Bottom, Tidal Flat, Natural Lake, Cypress Swamp and Scrub.

Habitat Management Programs

The FWC's Aquatic Habitat Conservation and Restoration Section has the responsibility of restoring, enhancing and managing publicly owned freshwater and saltwater habitats throughout the state. This benefits fish and wildlife which depend on these resources and the public who utilizes these waters for recreation and other purposes.

Upland plant

The Invasive Plant Management Section within the Division of Habitat and Species Conservation of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is the lead agency in Florida responsible for coordinating and funding two statewide programs controlling invasive aquatic and upland plants on public conservation lands and waterways throughout the state. Florida's aquatic plant management program is one of the oldest invasive species removal programs with its beginnings dating back to the late 1800s. With the addition of the upland program, the section oversees the largest invasive plant management program of its kind in the United States. The section also insures that beneficial native aquatic plants in Florida's ponds, lakes, and rivers are protected through its permitting programs.

Over half of Florida is privately owned. The land-use planning efforts and habitat management decisions made by private landowners today will determine the future for fish and wildlife tomorrow. Learn how you can get involved

Devil Hammock WMA

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) has a management interest in approximately 5 million acres of natural resource land in Florida.  Lands within the FWC managed-areas system are comprised of both private lands (especially timber companies) and those under the jurisdiction of various government agencies including the U.S. Forest Service, Department of Defense, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Florida Water Management Districts, the Florida Forest Service, Florida Department of Military Affairs, and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection's Division of Recreation and Parks.

Sandhill Community on Fort White Wildlife and Environmental Area

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) has primary management responsibility for approximately 1.4 million acres of the nearly 5.9 million acres within the Wildlife Management Area (WMA/WEAs) system.  FWC land managers and researchers, in cooperation with the Florida Natural Areas Inventory (FNAI), developed objective-based vegetation management (OBVM) to inform natural community management on the areas for which FWC has primary management responsibility.

Prescribed fire is an important wildlife management tool.