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  • Burmese pythons are non-venomous constrictors. They prey on native Florida species of mammals, birds and reptiles, as well as nonnative species including black rats. They have eaten Key Largo woodrats, a federally endangered species.

  • The Burmese python may reach a length of 26 feet and a weight of more than 200 pounds.

  • The average size of a Burmese python removed in Florida is 8 to 10 feet.

  • The native range of the Burmese python stretches from India to lower China, throughout the Malay Peninsula and on some islands in the East Indies. These pythons usually live near water.

  • Although semi-aquatic, this snake is a good climber.

  • A female Burmese python may lay 50-100 eggs and will wrap its body around the clutch to keep it warm and to defend the eggs against predators. The female python can raise its temperature by rhythmically twitching muscles, which generates heat and helps incubate the eggs. This incubation process may last two to three months. Once the eggs are hatched, young pythons are on their own to survive.

  • There is a low risk of a human attack by a Burmese python. Documented human attacks by pythons in the United States involve the owners captive snakes and their owner or immediate family.

  • As a Prohibited species, Burmese pythons are no longer allowed to be acquired or possessed as a pet or for commercial sale in Florida. Only properly permitted public exhibitors and researchers may acquire these animals. However, Burmese pythons that were already in personal possession as pets on or before July 1, 2010, may remain with their owners for the remainder of the snakes' lives. Owners of these limited pet Burmese pythons must maintain a valid Reptile of Concern license for these animals.

  • Burmese pythons are not native to Florida and are considered to be an invasive species due to their impacts to native wildlife. This species is not protected in Florida except by anti-cruelty law. Pythons can be killed on private property with landowner permission and can also be killed year-round and without a permit on 25 public lands in south Florida. The FWC encourages people to kill wild caught pythons whenever possible. A permit is required to possess live captured Burmese pythons for eradication and control purposes. 

  • Qualified individuals may apply for the Python Action Team Removing Invasive Constrictors (PATRIC) program.  Contractors are paid to conduct surveys and remove pythons.  Members of the public with any experience level may view Python Patrol trainings and are encouraged to compete in the Florida Python Challenge®.