python-mercer.jpgRegulations for Conditional Snakes and Lizards

The following species, including their taxonomic successors, subspecies, hybrids or eggs, are now listed as conditional snakes and lizards:

  • Indian or Burmese python (Python molurus)
  • Reticulated python (Python reticulatus)
  • Northern African python (Python sebae)
  • Southern African python (Python natalensis)
  • Amethystine python (Morelia amethistinus)
  • Scrub python (Morelia kinghorni)
  • Green anaconda (Eunectes murinus)
  • Nile monitor (Varanus niloticus)

Conditional reptiles are not allowed to be acquired for personal possession.  Reptile dealers, public exhibitors, researchers and nuisance trappers may apply for a permit to import or possess conditional snakes and lizards.  Individuals that possessed of any of these reptile species as personal pets and that were properly licensed under a Reptile of Concern license before July 1, 2010 may keep their animal and must maintain a valid Reptile of Concern license for the remainder of the animal's life.

Conditional snakes and lizards must be kept indoors or in outdoor enclosures with a fixed roof and must be permanently identified with a microchip when the animal reaches one inch in diameter, unless the animal is to be exported out of the state within 180 days.  Conditional snakes and lizards must be double-bagged and placed into a secure container for transport.  Owners of conditional snakes and lizards must submit a Captive Wildlife Critical Incident/Disaster Plan and must maintain records or their inventory.

Amnesty for Conditional Snakes and Lizards

Conditional snakes and lizards can be surrendered without penalty at Exotic Pet Amnesty Day events. Outside of events, anyone who possesses a conditional snake or lizard but cannot keep it can surrender the animal at any time with no penalties through the Exotic Pet Amnesty Program by calling our Exotic Species Hotline at 888-Ive-Got1 (888-483-4681).

 


 

 



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