alligator.jpg

Although the marsh is most easily traversed by airboats and tracked vehicles, the network of levees and canals constructed for flood control and water supply afford ample opportunities for recreation.

 

Fishing

fishing-AlanZaremba.jpg
Photo Credit: Alan Zaremba

The canals surrounding the area support many species of game fish including largemouth bass, bluegill and other species of sunfish, as well as catfish and several species of exotic fishes. In addition, the canal system serves as a refuge for smaller fish species during periods of severe drought. These forage fish are an important part of the prey base for many species of wading birds. Reference the map of Rotenberger WMA to locate boat ramps. Appropriate licenses and permits are required.


Hiking and Bicycling

Hiking-and-Bicycling.jpg

Enjoy hiking and bicycling on most levees, which provide scenic views of the area and opportunities to view wildlife. See the regulations summary to plan access and routes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skyflower-Hydrolea-corymbosa.jpg

 

Skyflowers are some of the wildflowers found blooming in freshwater marshes. Look for this perennial Florida native in the spring.

 

Hunting

hunting.jpg
Photo Credit: Meaghan Manning

Hunting of waterfowl, white-tailed deer, feral hogs, alligators, small game and conditional reptiles occurs in the fall, winter and spring. Prescribed burning and tree island restoration programs help maintain and improve wildlife habitat. Appropriate licenses and permits are required. Check the calendar and regulations summary for an area map, specific dates, and quota permit requirements. 

 

 

Wildlife Viewing & Photography

wildlife-viewing.jpg

Canal and powerline levees are good places to view birds and other wildlife. Swallow-tailed kites, red-shouldered hawks, rails and a variety of wading birds, water birds and waterfowl are common. Other native wildlife common on the area include alligators, white-tailed deer, bobcats, raccoons and marsh rabbits. This area is part of the Great Florida Birding and Wildlife Trail. Visit the Wildlife page for more information about the area's wildlife.

 

Camping

camping.jpg

Camp on the Miami Canal, Manley Ditch and Powerline levees during hunting seasons and on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays during non-hunting periods. See the regulations summary for hunting season dates.

 

 



FWC Facts:
Wood stork nestlings are fully feathered and capable of short flights at about 7-8 weeks of age but are not independent of their parents until they are 9-10 weeks old.

Learn More at AskFWC