Ochlockonee River Wildlife Management Area

Managed in cooperation with
Florida Forest Service

 

photo of bald eagle
Bald eagle

Ochlockonee River WMA is part of the 19,347-acre Lake Talquin State Forest and consists of nearly 3,000 acres in western Leon County near Tallahassee. The Ochlockonee River forms the western boundary of the area. Most of the area is hardwood forest, cypress swamps, and pinelands. The plentiful wildlife includes red-shouldered hawks, bobcats, coyotes, white-tailed deer, and turkeys. Two short loop roads (approximately two miles) near the two entrances are popular spots for bicycling, hiking, horseback riding and wildlife viewing. Children under the age of 16 are required to wear a helmet when horseback riding on public lands.  For more detailed information go to Nicole's Law PDF.  All horseback riders must have proof of current negative Coggins Test results for their horses when on state lands. Squirrel hunting is excellent on the Ochlockonee River WMA. Deer hunting, which is best along the river, is available in archery and muzzleloading gun seasons. Camping is prohibited on this area.

Rules Regarding Dogs

  • For purposes other than hunting, dogs are allowed, but must be kept under physical restraint at all times. Dogs are prohibited in areas posted as "Closed to Public Access" by FWC administrative action. No person shall allow any dog to pursue or molest any wildlife during any period in which the taking of wildlife by the use of dogs is prohibited.
  • Hunting dogs may be taken onto the WMA after 8 a.m. the day before the opening of a season and shall be removed by 6 p.m. one day after the end of the season. Hunting with dogs, other than bird dogs or retrievers, is prohibited. Dogs are prohibited in areas posted as "Closed to Public Access" by FWC administrative action. No person shall allow any dog to pursue or molest any wildlife during any period in which the taking of wildlife by the use of dogs is prohibited. Dogs on leashes may be used for trailing wounded game.



FWC Facts:
The $2.7 billion that people spend to view wildlife in Florida is more than double the value of the state’s annual orange harvest.

Learn More at AskFWC