Middle Aucilla Wildlife Management Area

Managed in cooperation with
Suwannee River Water Management District

 

Photo of Aucilla River
Todd Bertolaet

Middle Aucilla WMA lies along the Aucilla River at the intersection of Jefferson, Taylor, and Madison counties. The area's 2,000 plus acres were acquired to protect the Aucilla River watershed. Along the river are floodplain forests and a mixture of pine flatwoods and pine/hardwood forests. Numerous pre-historic archeological sites have been found within the WMA. Waterfowl, songbirds, raptors, and shorebirds are common.

The Aucilla is a popular fishing spot for bream, catfish, and largemouth bass. Hunting, fishing, wildlife viewing, horseback riding, paddling, hiking, and biking are among the available recreational opportunities.  Children under the age of 16 are required to wear a helmet when horseback riding on public lands.  For more detailed information go to Nicole's Law PDF.  All horseback riders must have proof of current negative Coggins Test results for their horses when on state lands.

Rules Regarding Dogs

  • For purposes other than hunting, dogs are allowed, but must be kept under physical restraint at all times. Dogs are prohibited in areas posted as "Closed to Public Access" by FWC administrative action. No person shall allow any dog to pursue or molest any wildlife during any period in which the taking of wildlife by the use of dogs is prohibited.
  • Hunting dogs may be taken onto the WMA after 8 a.m. the day before the opening of a season and shall be removed by 6 p.m. one day after the end of the season. Hunting deer or wild hog with dogs is prohibited. Hunting with dogs other than bird dogs or waterfowl retrievers is prohibited. Dogs are prohibited in areas posted as "Closed to Public Access" by FWC administrative action. No person shall allow any dog to pursue or molest any wildlife during any period in which the taking of wildlife by the use of dogs is prohibited. Dogs on leashes may be used for trailing wounded game.



FWC Facts:
American kestrels nest in cavities that they do not excavate. Instead, they depend on woodpeckers and natural processes to create holes in trees.

Learn More at AskFWC