Troy Springs Wildlife Management Area

Managed in cooperation with
Suwannee River Water Management District

 

photo of wooded road
Edwin McCook
Suwannee River
Water Management District

Troy Springs WMA lies along more than 4 miles of the Middle Suwannee River in east Lafayette County. Three parcels of land, of primarily floodplain forests, comprise its nearly 2,000 acres. Troy Springs State Park and a county park are nestled in between the wildlife management area tracts. Nearby Troy Springs issues more than 65 million gallons of water each day. Troy Springs WMA is a small game hunting area. Hiking, biking, wildlife viewing, and horseback riding are permitted on the many trails. Species on this area include white-tailed deer, turkeys, eastern cottontail rabbits, gray squirrels, feral hogs, gopher tortoises, neo-tropical migrants and red-shouldered hawks.  Children under the age of 16 are required to wear a helmet when horseback riding on public lands.  For more detailed information go to Nicole's Law PDF.  All horseback riders must have proof of current negative Coggins Test results for their horses when on state lands.  Fishing, canoeing, and boating opportunities are ample on the Suwannee River. Two canoe launches and a boat ramp are adjacent to the management area.

Rules Regarding Dogs

  • For purposes other than hunting, dogs are allowed, but must be kept under physical restraint at all times. Dogs are prohibited in areas posted as "Closed to Public Access" by FWC administrative action. No person shall allow any dog to pursue or molest any wildlife during any period in which the taking of wildlife by the use of dogs is prohibited.
  • Hunting dogs may be taken onto the WMA after 8 a.m. the day before the opening of a season and shall be removed by 6 p.m. one day after the end of the season. Dogs on leashes may be used for trailing wounded game. Hunting with dogs is prohibited. Dogs are prohibited in areas posted as "Closed to Public Access" by FWC administrative action. No person shall allow any dog to pursue or molest any wildlife during any period in which the taking of wildlife by the use of dogs is prohibited.



FWC Facts:
American kestrels nest in cavities that they do not excavate. Instead, they depend on woodpeckers and natural processes to create holes in trees.

Learn More at AskFWC