Publications of research conducted or funded by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

Krysko, K.L., D.J. Smith, and C.A. Smith. 2010. Historic and current geographic distribution and preliminary evidence of population genetic structure in the eastern indigo snake (Drymarchon couperi) in the southeastern United States. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Tallahassee. Final Report. 36 pp.

Stevenson, D.J., M.R. Bolt, D.J. Smith, K.M. Enge, N.L. Hyslop, T.M. Norton, and K.J. Dyer. 2010. Prey records for the eastern indigo snake (Drymarchon couperi). Southeastern Naturalist 9(1):1-18. Access Publication.

Stevenson, D.K., K.M. Enge, L.D. Carlile, K.J. Dyer, T.M. Norton, N.L. Hyslop, and R.A. Kiltie. 2009. An eastern indigo snake (Drymarchon couperi) mark-recapture study in southeastern Georgia. Herpetological Conservation and Biology 40:30-42.
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Foster, G.W., P.E. Moler, J.M. Kinsella, S.P. Terrell, and D.J. Forrester. 2000. Parasites of eastern indigo snakes (Drymarchon corais couperi) from Florida, U.S.A. Comparative Parasitology 67(1):124-128. Access Publication.

Moler, P.E. 1987. Delicate balance. Species: eastern indigo snake (Drymarchon corais couperi). Florida Wildlife 41(4):19. Access Publication.

Moler, P.E. 1985. Distribution of the eastern indigo snake, Drymarchon corais couperi, in Florida. Herpetological Review 16(2):37-38. Access Publication.

Diemer, J.E. and D.W. Speake. 1983. The distribution of the eastern indigo snake, Drymarchon corais couperi, in Georgia. Journal of Herpetology 17(3):256-264.
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Speake, D.W., J. Diemer, and J. McGlincy. 1982. Eastern indigo snake recovery plan. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Atlanta, Georgia. 23 pp.

Moler, P.E. 1982. Home range and seasonal activity of the eastern indigo snake, Drymarchon corais couperi, in northern Florida. Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission, Wildlife Research Laboratory, Gainesville, Florida. 17 pp.



FWC Facts:
Manatees can travel up to 50 miles in a day. They generally swim slowly but have been clocked at speeds of up to 15 mph for short bursts.

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