Goliath Grouper Reports and Research

Read about stock assessments and other scientific research on goliath grouper.

An Investigation into the Habitat, Behavior and Opportunistic Feeding Strategies of the Protected Goliath Grouper (Epinephelus itajara) Adobe PDF (PDF 4.8MB) (Collins 2014)

An evaluation of the effects of catch and release angling on survival and behavior of Goliath grouper (Epinephelus itajara) with additional investigation into residence and long-term movement patterns Adobe PDF (PDF 2.4MB) (Collins and Barbieri 2014)

Pattern of recovery of the goliath grouper Epinephelus itajara population in the southeastern U.S. Adobe PDF (PDF 6.5MB) (Koenig et al. 2011)

Behavior, Habitat, and Abundance of the Goliath Grouper, Epinephelus itajara, in the Central Eastern Gulf of Mexico Adobe PDF (PDF 1.6MB) (Collins and Barbieri 2010)

A Preliminary Assessment of the Abundance and Size Distribution of Goliath Grouper, Epinephelus itajara, Within a Defined Region of the Central Eastern Gulf of Mexico (Collins 2009)


Status Report on the Continental United States Distinct Population Segment of the Goliath Grouper Adobe PDF (PDF 1.6MB) (NMFS 2006)


The Goliath Grouper in Southern Florida: Assessment Review and Advisory Report Adobe PDF (PDF 1.4MB) (SEDAR 6, 2004)


A Preliminary Discussion of Acceptable Harvest Levels for Scientific Sampling of Goliath Grouper in the U.S. South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico Adobe PDF (PDF 58KB)(Porch and Barbieri 2007)


Mangroves as Essential Nursery Habitat for Goliath Grouper Adobe PDF (PDF 577KB) (Koenig et al. 2007)


A Catch-Free Stock Assessment Model With Application to Goliath Grouper off southern Florida Adobe PDF (PDF 650KB) (Porch et al. 2006)


Habitat Use of Juvenile Goliath Grouper in the Florida Keys Adobe PDF (PDF 786KB) (Frias-Torres 2006)


Age, Growth and Reproduction in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico Adobe PDF (PDF 585KB) (Bullock et al. 1992)



FWC Facts:
Manatees have molars but no front teeth (no incisors or canines). Manatee teeth are unusual among mammals because they are continually replaced throughout the animals' lives.

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