Tools for Tracking Red Tides

FWC scientists combine field sampling with tools maintained by state and federal partners to track red tides and their effects.

The HAB group works most closely with the University of South Florida (USF), whose tools show size and location of blooms and forecast bloom movement. We also work with federal partners to publicize information we collect.

 

  West coast forecast map

Collaboration for Prediction of Red Tides
In this collaboration, scientists at USF insert FWC bloom data into the West Florida Shelf Regional Ocean Modeling System to create three-day forecasts of ongoing Karenia brevis blooms.

 

USF Optical Oceanography Laboratory 
Scientists in the Optical Oceanography Lab at USF use special formulas called algorithms to process NASA and NOAA data and generate satellite images that FWC scientists use to direct sampling efforts and assess the extent of blooms. 

 

Harmful Algal Bloom Observing System 
FWC scientists provide data to the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration’s Harmful Algal Blooms Observing System (HABSOS). This interactive system can be used to visualize blooms and changes in environmental factors.   

 

Beach Conditions Reporting System
To complement FWC Red Tide Status Reports and forecasts produced by USF, Mote Marine Laboratory provides up-to-date information about respiratory irritation and dead fish from red tides at local beaches.

 

Harmful Algal Bloom Operational Forecast System
FWC scientists provide data to the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration’s Harmful Algal Blooms Operational Forecast System (HAB-OFS) for creation and distribution of bulletins. 



FWC Facts:
Johnson's seagrass (Halophila johnsonii) lives only in Florida, and is the only federally listed threatened marine plant species.

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