Harmful Algal Blooms in Florida ("White Paper")

This report, also called the "White Paper," was prepared by the Harmful Algal Bloom Task Force Technical Advisory Group. It was submitted to the Task Force in 1999.

Edited by K.A. Steidinger, J.H. Landsberg, C.R. Tomas and J.W. Burns

When using this report please reference:

Steidinger, K.A., Landsberg, J.H., Tomas, C.R., and Burns, J.W. 1999. Harmful algal blooms in Florida, Unpublished technical report submitted to the Florida Harmful Algal Bloom Task Force, Florida Marine Research Institute, 63pp.

CONTENTS

FORWARD
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
INTRODUCTION

RED TIDE

Background

Resource Impacts

Public Health Impacts

Economic Impacts

Recommendations for Action

PFIESTERIA-LIKE SPECIES IN FLORIDA'S ESTUARINE WATERS

Background

Resource Impacts

Public Health Impacts

Economic Impacts

Recommendations for Action

CIGUATERA

Background

Resource Impacts

Public Health Impacts

Economic Impacts

Recommendations for Action

TOXIC BLUE-GREEN ALGAE (CYANOBACTERIA) IN FRESH/ESTUARINE WATERS

Background

Resource Impacts

Public Health Impacts

Economic Impacts

Recommendations for Action

HARMFUL MICROALGAE AS TUMOR PROMOTERS

Background

Resource Impacts

Public Health Impacts

Economic Impacts

Recommendations for Action

MACROALGAE

Background

Resource Impacts

Public Health Impacts

Economic Impacts

Recommendations for Action

REFERENCES
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

APPENDICES

Appendix I - HAB Species and Toxins

Appendix II - Technical Advisory Group

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Prior to July 1, 2004, the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute was known as the Florida Marine Research Institute. The institute name has not been changed in historical articles and articles that directly reference work done by the Florida Marine Research Institute.



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