News Releases

Share your bay scallop input with the FWC; workshops scheduled for October

News Release

Thursday, October 05, 2017

Media contact: Amanda Nalley, 850-410-4943 or Amanda.Nalley@MyFWC.com

This summer, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) implemented staggered season start and end dates for bay scallop harvest. The FWC needs your feedback on this staggered season structure before determining how to manage the season in the future.

The FWC will be hosting five public workshops including areas of the state where scallop harvest is allowed as well as in Pasco County, where harvest currently is not allowed. The goal of these workshops will be to gather input on the bay scallop fishery, including whether this year’s staggered season made for a more enjoyable time on the water and whether it had any economic impact on the coastal communities that depend upon this fishery. Input from these workshops will be discussed at a future Commission meeting and will help the FWC determine what the bay scallop season structure should be in future years.

Upcoming in-person workshops are scheduled as follows (scheduled 6 to 8 p.m. local time except for Port St. Joe):

  • Oct. 12: Port St. Joe, Gulf County Board of County Commissioners, Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd. (this meeting only is from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. ET).
  • Oct. 16: Steinhatchee, Steinhatchee Landing Resort, 219 NE Highway 51.
  • Oct. 17: Land O’ Lakes, Land O’ Lakes Recreation Complex, Meeting Rooms 3 & 4, 3032 Collier Parkway.
  • Oct. 18: Crystal River, City Council Chambers, 123 NW Highway 19.
  • Oct. 26: Carrabelle, Franklin County Senior Center, 201 NW Ave. F.

For updates and to learn more about these workshops, visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and click on “Saltwater Fishing,” “Public Comments/Workshops” and “Workshops.”

Can’t make a meeting? Written comments may be submitted online at MyFWC.com/SaltwaterComments.



FWC Facts:
The range of a male Florida black bear is about 60,000 acres. For a female, it's 15,000 acres.

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