News Releases

Gulf cobia workshops scheduled: FWC seeking public input

News Release

Tuesday, May 09, 2017

Media contact: Amanda Nalley, 850-410-4943 or Amanda.Nalley@MyFWC.com

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is hosting five public workshops and an online webinar to gather public input on the Gulf cobia fishery.

Staff have heard concerns about cobia in recent years, especially in the panhandle area of the state. Cobia is currently open year-round and has a minimum size limit of 33 inches fork length and a daily bag limit of one fish per person from state waters with a maximum of six fish per vessel.

Meeting locations and dates are as follows (from 6-8 p.m. local time, except the webinar):

  • Tallahassee – May 16 – LeRoy Collins Leon County Public Library, 200 W. Park Ave.
  • Pensacola – May 18 – Sanders Beach-Corinne Jones Resource Center Parks & Recreation Department - 913 S. I St.
  • Destin – May 22 – Destin Community Center - 101 Stahlman Ave.
  • Panama City – May 23 – Gulf Coast State College, Enrollment Services Building, Room 124/The Gardner Room, 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98.
  • Statewide webinar – May 24 (6-8 p.m. EDT) – Learn more about how to participate at MyFWC.com/Fishing by clicking on “Saltwater Fishing,” “Rulemaking” and “Webinar Instructions.”
  • St. Petersburg – May 25 – FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, Karen A. Steidinger Auditorium - 100 Eighth Ave. SE. 

Provide input on this important Gulf coast fishery by attending a public workshop.

The FWC is also accepting public input on the status of the Atlantic coast cobia fishery and additional feedback opportunities may follow.

Written comments on cobia and other topics can also be submitted at MyFWC.com/SaltwaterComments. For your online comments on cobia to be considered at the July 10-11 Commission meeting, submit them no later than June 15.

Learn more about these workshops at MyFWC.com/Fishing by clicking on “Saltwater Fishing,” “Rulemaking” and “Public Workshops.”

 



FWC Facts:
Some biologists feel that mullet jump because they are trying to remove parasites. Others believe it may be part of schooling behavior in mullet.

Learn More at AskFWC