News Releases

Public safety communicators honor FWC officer

News Release

Tuesday, July 09, 2013

Media contact: Carli Segelson, 772-215-9459

From handling boating accidents to providing information about alligators or fishing, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) Officer Jorge Pino has been staying busy as usual.

Pino is the public information officer (PIO) for the agency’s South Region-B and was chosen as this year’s PIO of the Year by the Florida Law Enforcement Public Information Officers Association.

The statewide organization includes representatives from local, state and federal law enforcement and public safety organizations with the mission of providing support and promoting professional development among its members. 

“I have complete trust in Officer Pino’s communications with the media and am proud to have him working in the FWC’s South-B Region,” said Maj. Alfredo Escanio, regional commander for the area.

Pino has dutifully served the FWC for nearly 10 years, working as a PIO the entire time. During 2012, he went above and beyond in serving the state – assisting with events, coordinating television shows and managing media inquiries during high-profile and high-stress situations.

“Officer Pino is a tremendous asset to the FWC. His dedication to the agency has maintained and improved its image and level of professionalism,” Escanio said.

Pino helps manage statewide boating safety campaigns by hosting events and communicating with the media in his area. He coordinates boat shows, press conferences and media ride-alongs, all in the interest of ensuring Florida boaters are safe.

“It’s comforting to have someone like Officer Pino promoting these messages and representing the core missions of the agency. His confidence and professionalism on camera are valuable assets,” Escanio said.

In his boating safety efforts, and throughout all of his media outreach work, Pino consistently works with Spanish-speaking media outlets to engage Florida’s Spanish-speaking residents and visitors.

Pino also stays busy promoting and attending the FWC’s “Exotic Pet Amnesty Days,” coordinating outreach events for youth and adults, providing information on fishing and hunting rules, handling alligator incidents and recruiting potential new officers.

“Officer Pino consistently represents the FWC and the state in a positive light, ensuring residents and visitors are well-informed and safe,” Escanio said.

Pino has been a law enforcement officer for 24 years. He began his career with the Miami Police Department, where he worked as a patrol officer, a school resource officer, a gang detective, a robbery detective and a public information officer.

In 2003, Pino retired from the Miami Police Department and joined the FWC, pursuing a career protecting the valuable natural resources of the state.

“I could not have achieved this recognition without the support that I get from all of my co-workers,” Pino said. “I am honored to receive this award, and it makes it so much better to know that the people who voted for me as the PIO of the Year were all my peers. I will continue to work hard for the people of Florida.” 



FWC Facts:
A shrimp escapes predators by quickly pulling its abdomen in toward its carapace (body). This motion shoots it through the water backward.

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