Wild Turkey Management Program

Gobbler

Mission: Ensuring healthy and sustainable wild turkey populations throughout the state, while providing and promoting compatible uses of the resource.

 

Description

One of the most coveted and sought-after game species in Florida is the Osceola turkey, also known as the Florida turkey. This unique bird is one of five subspecies of wild turkey in North America.

The Osceola lives on the Florida peninsula and nowhere else in the world, making it extremely popular with out-of-state hunters. It's similar to the eastern subspecies (found in the Panhandle) but tends to be a bit smaller and typically a darker shade with less white barring on the flight feathers of its wings.

The white bars on the Osceola are more narrow, with an irregular, broken pattern, and they don't extend to the feather shaft. It's the black bars of the Osceola that actually dominate the feather. In conjunction, secondary wing feathers also are darker.  When the wings are folded across the back, the whitish triangular patch formed is less visible on the Osceola. Osceola feathers also show more iridescent green and red colors, with less bronze than the eastern.

Turkey Hunting


New! 
Beginning July 1, 2014, new rules affecting turkey daily bag limits will take effect. Additional information on new Statewide Bag Limits.

New! The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) recently conducted an online poll to gather information on hunter interest in expanding shooting hours on public Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) during the spring turkey season. View the results of this online poll here. Poll Summary Adobe PDF / Poll Survey Adobe PDF

 Turkey Registry

Turkey mapThe National Wild Turkey Federation External Website and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) recognize, in their respective turkey registry programs, any wild turkey harvested within or south of the counties of Dixie, Gilchrist, Alachua, Union, Bradford, Clay and Duval, to be the Osceola subspecies. Eastern turkeys and hybrids are found north and west of those counties in the Panhandle.

If you harvest a turkey with an 11-inch beard or longer and at least 1¼-inch spurs, you can get your name listed in the FWC's Wild Turkey Registry by applying for an "Outstanding Gobbler Certificate."  There's also a "First Gobbler Certificate" awarded to hunters under age 16 who harvest their first gobbler, regardless of beard or spur measurements.

View more information on the Wild Turkey Registry, including the complete listing, the current top 10 birds and applications for both certificates.

 General Information



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