Lake TalquinGadsden and Leon counties

Located just west of Tallahassee, this 8,800 acre reservoir is nationally known for its high quality Black Crappie (speckled perch) fishery. The best Black Crappie fishing occurs in winter months (January through April) during the prespawn and spawning period. There is very little vegetation, but lots of tree stumps and logs. At certain times of year Largemouth Bass, Bluegill, Redear, White Bass, and Striped Bass fishing are excellent. Lake Talquin, for a Florida lake, is deep with an average depth of 15 feet and a maximum depth of 40 feet. There are 7 public boat ramps and 5 public fishing piers on the Leon County side of the lake (Hwy 20). On the Gadsden County side, there are 3 public boat ramps and 2 public fishing piers. Six fish camps surround the lake. For additional information you may contact Whipporwill Sportman's Lodge at 850-875-2605. All crappie that are less than 10 inches in total length must be released immediately.

Fishhound External Website also offers a fishing forecast for the Lake Talquin External Website.

 

TrophyCatchTrophyCatch Tracker

TrophyCatch is FWC's citizen-science program that rewards anglers for documenting and releasing trophy bass 8 pounds or larger. The following TrophyCatch bass have been submitted from Lake Talquin:

Lunker Club (8 – 9.9 pounds): 37

Trophy Club (10 – 12.9 pounds): 13

 

Current Forecast:

Lake Talquin is also your best bet to land a trophy bass in the region.  Largemouth bass should be on the ledges near the river channel throughout the summer.  Try deep diving crankbaits or Carolina-rigged worms for the best results.  Work the vegetation in the back of the creeks at sunrise and sunset for some topwater action.  Remember the new statewide bass regulation goes into effect July 1, 2016 which is a 5 fish daily bag limit, only one of which may be 16 inches in total length or longer.

 



FWC Facts:
Freshwater catfish have many external taste buds on their barbels, so they use their sense of taste more than their sight to find prey.

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