Okaloosa County

Karick LakeKarick Lake is a 65-acre man-made impoundment constructed in 1965, opened to fishing in 1966, and is designated as a Fish Management Area. The lake has an average depth of 7 feet with a maximum depth of 18 feet, with the deepest areas located near the dam and along the old streambed. A considerable amount of flooded timber remains, providing fish habitat. The lake has been stocked with largemouth bass, bluegill, redear sunfish (shellcracker), and channel catfish. Karick Lake is located in northwestern Okaloosa County off County Road 189 approximately 8 miles north of Baker, FL. Concrete boat ramps with courtesy docks are located in both the north and south campgrounds. A handicapped accessible fishing pier is located adjacent to the boat ramp in the north campground. Both campgrounds are accessible from CR 189. Informational kiosks are located adjacent to each boat ramp. The south campground contains primitive campsites (no electrical or water hookups) and picnic areas. The north campground has picnic grounds and campsites are available with both electric and water hookups. Both campgrounds have restroom/bath facilities and are maintained by the Florida Forest Service. Bait, supplies, and other conveniences are available in nearby Baker and Blackmon, FL. Karick Lake is subject to the rules and regulations currently in effect for Fish Management Areas. Please refer to a current copy of Florida Freshwater Sport Fishing Regulations. Gasoline boat motors are prohibited from use on Karick Lake; however, use of electric trolling motors is allowed.

For additional information regarding fishing opportunities at Karick Lake contact Blackwater Fisheries Center in Holt, Fl. Phone 850-957-6177.

 

Popular species:

Popular fish species

Fish graphics by Duane Raver, Jr.

 

TrophyCatchTrophyCatch Tracker

TrophyCatch External link is FWC's citizen-science program that rewards anglers for documenting and releasing trophy bass 8 pounds or larger.

Be the first to submit a trophy bass from Karick Lake!

 

 

 Current Forecast:

Drawdown Scheduled for Karick Lake Fish Management Area

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is partnering with the Florida Forest Service and Aquatic Habitat Restoration Section (AHRES) to conduct a full renovation of Karick Lake Fish Management Area in Okaloosa County. Beginning July 13, 2017, the agency will begin to release water for a complete drawdown.

This renovation is taking place in order to improve fish habitat and balance the Largemouth Bass population. A full drawdown will allow for the aeration and consolidation of organic muck deposits that result from the natural aging of reservoirs, thus improving fish habitat and natural production for fish food organisms.

While the lake is down, structural habitat will be installed in the lake bed and maintenance will be performed on the dam and water control structure. Once water has been returned to the lake, it will be re-stocked to provide a balanced fish community.

Fishing will be permitted while water is being drained from the lake, however access to the lakebed is prohibited. Unstable substrate exposed as the lake drains presents a hazard to individuals attempting to traverse it. Vehicles are not permitted on the dam or fishing fingers. People who catch or remove fish are required to possess a valid Florida freshwater fishing license unless exempt from license requirements. Legal methods of catching fish include hook and line. Possessing or transporting commercial quantities of freshwater game fish (150 pounds or more) is illegal.

For the duration of the project, campgrounds and hiking trails surrounding the lake will remain open to the public. Hurricane and Bear lakes are both located on the Blackwater River State Forest and provide ample fishing opportunities within easy travelling distances from the Karick Lake campgrounds.

For more information about this project, email Neil Branson (850) 957-0003.

 



FWC Facts:
The Gulf sturgeon spawns 140 miles upstream from the mouth of the Suwannee River, one of the last pristine rivers with no dams to bar its path.

Learn More at AskFWC