GLOSSARY (and Acronyms)

  • Adaptive management: A method of natural resource management that integrates design, management, and monitoring to systematically test assumptions in order to modify and adapt the activities in response to the observed effects.
  • Age-structure: A breakdown of the different age groups of a particular fish species. For fishes, ages are commonly determined by counting annual rings associated with bony hard parts, such as fin spines and otoliths (ear bones).
  • Angler diaries: Records kept by anglers detailing their fishing trips. These diaries often contain details about the number and size of fish caught, weather and lake conditions, techniques used to catch fish (lure type, color of lure, speed of retrieve, etc.) and any other details the angler feels are important.
  • Angler Ethics: Actions practiced by anglers that promotes safe and responsible enjoyment of fishing resources.
  • Angler-hour: A measure of fishing pressure. One angler-hour is equal to one angler fishing for one hour.
  • Angler success: The rate at which fish are caught by anglers. It is expressed in number of fish caught per angler-hour of effort.
  • Anthropogenic: Conditions that result from human activities. "Anthropo-" meaning human and "-genic" meaning produced from.
  • Aquatic habitat enhancement: Projects designed to improve or create new habitat in a body of water. Examples of aquatic habitat enhancement include but are not limited to replanting of native vegetation, removal of muck sediments, installing brush piles, and fish attractors.
  • ARES (FWC/Aquatic Resource Enhancement Section): The section of HSC within the FWC responsible for aquatic plant restoration projects.
  • Bag limits (creel limits): The legal number of fish an angler may possess in a given day.
  • B.A.S.S.: The Bass Anglers Sportsman Society's goals are to create a credible and honorable tournament trail, to improve our environment by uniting and amplifying the voices of anglers and to secure a future for our youth.
  • BBMP (Black Bass Management Plan): A long-term management plan for all black bass species in Florida that will ensure their survival and sustainable use. This plan's focus it to ensure Florida's recognition as "The Bass Fishing Capital of the World."
  • BMP (Best Management Practices): A set of standards designed to bring consistency, effectiveness, and efficiency to various programs, based on research and the practical learning of others. The suite of best available technologies or processes is intended to be practical and achieve the desired goal or objective.
  • Bed fishing: Angling for fish while they are preparing a spawning bed or protecting eggs and fry. Often done by sight fishing and sometimes using a ladder or other high platform to locate breeding fish and target them.
  • Benthic: The bottom of rivers, lakes, or oceans; can also refer to organisms that live on the bottom of water bodies.
  • "Big Catch": An angler recognition program that encourages fishermen with a memorable catch (based on minimum length) of one of 33 different species of Florida freshwater fishes.
  • Biodiversity: The number of different species inhabiting a specific area or region.
  • Biological productivity: The rate at which biomass is produced.
  • Biomass: The total weight or volume of a species in a given area. Some research, for instance, shows that total biomass may increase when new species (exotics) are introduced if they find a new niche; otherwise, they may replace native species.
  • Biota: Animal or plant life of a region considered as a total ecological entity.
  • Black bass: The group of freshwater sunfish, belonging to the Family Centrarchidae and Genus Micropterus, in Florida they include at least largemouth bass, shoal bass, spotted bass and Suwannee bass.
  • Blocknet: A net that is set to surround a tenth to a full-acre (depending on the size of net) of water from the water surface to the substrate (bottom). All of the fish in it are then killed normally using a toxin (rotenone) or percussion (explosive) so that all the fish can be collected, identified, counted, weighed and other detailed information may be recorded. It is the most comprehensive method of evaluating a freshwater system, but seldom used because of its lethality.
  • Bream: A generic term frequently used to describe the smaller sunfishes or panfish, such as bluegill, redear and spotted sunfish.
  • Camps: Fish camps are normally conducted as week-long day camps or overnight weekend camps. Research shows that the students' commitment to attending and the greater exposure to conservation issues and angling skills results in more measurable long-term behavioral changes-the goal of education efforts.
  • Carrying Capacity: The maximum number of organisms that can be supported in a given area or habitat.
  • Catch-and-Release: The practice of immediately releasing fish caught by an angler.
  • Catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE): The number of fish or invertebrates caught per unit of effort (e.g., hour or day; see definition of effort below). Catch-per-unit-effort is often used as a measure of relative abundance for a particular fishery species.
  • Climate change: The change in global weather patterns that are the result of human activities.
  • Clinics: Short educational programs(less than one day) designed to exposes individuals to recreational fishing and to teach fishing skills and ethics.
  • Closed seasons: A period of time where harvest of a species is prohibited.
  • CMI (Commission-Managed Impoundment): Impoundments managed as public fishing opportunities by the FWC.
  • COE (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers): The federal agency whose mission is to provide vital public engineering services in peace and war to strengthen our Nation's security, energize the economy, and reduce risks from disasters.
  • Communication: Ideally communication is a two-way flow of information that allows parties at both ends to agree to a given set of facts and understand each other's positions and their feelings about them.
  • Conditional species: The importation and introduction of non-native species is regulated under Florida Administrative Code 68-5.001. Conditional species are defined as non-native species that may only be possessed with a permit from the FWC. More information can be found online.
  • Conservation: The protection, improvement, and use of natural resources according to principles that will assure their highest continued economic or social benefits.
  • Creel (and Creel Survey): An angler study designed to gather information about angler effort for and the harvest of fish species in a given fishery.
  • CRO (FWC/Community Relations Office): The office within the FWC responsible for ensuring effective communication with the public.
  • DEP (Department of Environmental Protection): The state agency in Florida responsible for protecting our air, water, and land resources and enforcing the environmental laws protecting the state.
  • Derbies: One day fishing events hosted by the FWC or other third parties, where the public is invited to fish at a given location. These events are often staged to introduce individuals to the sport of fishing who might not otherwise have the opportunity to go fishing.
  • DFFM (FWC/Division of Freshwater Fisheries Management): The division of the FWC responsible for managing the freshwater fisheries within the state of Florida.
  • Discard Mortality: Fish that cannot be kept because of regulatory constraints (size limits, bag limits, etc.) must be released. Some percentage of these may die and estimates of this mortality are included in fishing mortality estimates.
  • DJ-Dingell-Johnson Act: see SFR-Federal Aid in Sportfish Restoration Act.
  • Drainage: The entire surface area of land that a flowing body of water drains.
  • Drawdown: The intentional lowering of a body of water to a level substantially lower than its typical water level. Managers employ drawdowns for a variety of reasons including: manipulation of aquatic plant and animal populations, and to aid in the removal and consolidation of muck sediments.
  • DRI-Development of Regional Impact: Chapter 380 of the Florida Statutes directs Regional Planning Councils to coordinate review of large-scale development projects which, because of their character, magnitude, or location, could have a substantial effect upon the health, safety, or welfare of the citizens of more than one county. Such projects are designated as DRIs and typically require input from many reviewing agencies.
  • Ecosystem: A community of organisms and the physical environment they live in interacting as an ecological unit; the entire biological and physical content of a biotope; biosystem.
  • Education: A process, by which skills, attitudes, knowledge and behaviors are established, enhanced and supported through a planned series of experiences that enable the individual to make informed decisions.
  • Effort: The amount of time and fishing power used to harvest fish. Fishing power includes gear type, size or efficiency, boat size, and horsepower. In recreational fisheries it is often expressed in angler-hours.
  • Electrofishing: A generally non-lethal method of sampling fish where an electrical current is passed through the water to immobilize fish. Stunned fish are collected using a dip net and biological data can be collected on the fish sampled.
  • Emergent plant: Aquatic plants that are rooted in the bottom, extend above the surface of the water and are self-supporting.
  • Endemic: Native to, and restricted to, a particular geographical region.
  • Eutrophication: The process by which nutrients, mostly nitrogen and phosphorus, important to biological productivity accumulate within a body of water. This process can be both naturally occurring and caused by human activity.
  • Exotic: Introduced species not native to the place where they are found.
  • Fecundity: A measurement of the egg-producing ability of a fish. Fecundity generally increases with age and size of the fish.
  • Fingerling: Loosely speaking fingerlings are young finger-sized fish. However, in hatchery settings Phase-I fingerling bass are typically about ¾-1½" long and historically were raised in outdoor ponds on zooplankton.
  • Fish Attractors: Generally speaking fish attractors are objects placed in the water to provide structure and habitat that concentrate fish in a given area. Fish attractors can be made of many different materials including: brush piles, rock piles, and PVC pipes.
  • Fisheries biology: The study of aquatic resources that include species of cultural and economic importance, the other organisms that they interact with, the environment they live in and the people that use the resource.
  • Fisheries recruitment: see Recruitment.
  • Fishery: A specific aquatic resource that include a species of cultural and economic importance, the other organisms that they interact with, the environment they live in and the people that affect the important species.
  • Fishing pressure: The amount of fishing activity on a given body of water. Fishing pressure by recreational anglers is most often measured in angler-hours.
  • Floating plants: Aquatic plants that float on the surface of the water and are not attached to the bottom.
  • Floy tag: An external tag attached to a fish that is used to identify a fish in a tagging study.
  • FMA (Fish Management Area): Water bodies that are specifically managed by the FWC using special regulations specific to that body of water.
  • Forage: The organisms that make up the diet of a fish species. In short, forage refers to all the "bait" fish species a bass eats.
  • Fry: Juvenile fish that have recently hatched. Yolk-sac fry are the young fish that still have a visible yolk sac providing them with nutrients until they are capable of feeding.
  • FWC (Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission): The agency responsible for managing Florida's fish and wildlife resources for their long-term well being and the benefit of people.
  • FWRI (FWC/Fish and Wildlife Research Institute): The division of the FWC responsible for coordinating and conducting research within the agency. They provide technical knowledge to the rest of the agency.
  • FYCCN (Florida Youth Conservation Center): Youth outdoor education centers established throughout the state, with the goals of exposing children to outdoor recreational activities, teaching children outdoor recreational skills and ethics and instilling an appreciation of the outdoors.
  • Genetic stock: see Stock.
  • Genetic tags: A method of genetically identifying fish from a particular stocking by determining the genetics of the parent fish that produced them.
  • Gillnets: A method of sampling fish, where a net is set in the water typically overnight. Fish are caught when the swim into the net and become entangled in the mesh of the net.
  • GIS (Geographical Information System): A computerized system of organizing and analyzing any spatial array of data and information.
  • Growth: Change in fish length or weight over time. We typically use change in length to describe growth in bass.
  • Harvest: The removal of fish from a body of water. Often measured as the total number or pounds of fish caught and kept from an area over a period of time.
  • HSC (FWC/Habitat and Species Conservation): The division of the FWC responsible for maintaining stable or increasing populations of fish and wildlife and managing the habitat they inhabit.
  • Hybrid: The offspring produced from the crossing of two distinct genetic strains or species.
  • Hybrid vigor: The production of genetically superior offspring through the crossing of genetically different parents. Crossing Florida and Northern largemouth bass provide some of this enhanced genetic benefit in fish stocked in some other states. However, since when they reproduce you lose many of the benefits, they are not desirable in Florida where they could contaminate pure Florida stock.
  • Hydrilla: An exotic aquatic plant that was first discovered in Florida in 1959. It has caused problems for aquatic plant managers because it can spread quickly, crowd out native vegetation and can be difficult to control.
  • Ichthyologists: Biologists that study fish.
  • Imperiled species: A species found on the state's consolidated list of the official state and federal lists of endangered species, threatened species, and other species designated in some way by the respective jurisdictional agencies as meriting special protection or consideration.
  • Impoundment: A body of water or sludge confined by a dam, dike, floodgate, or other barrier.
  • Intergrade: A hybrid population that possesses the genes of at least two other distinct subspecies or species.
  • Introduced Species: A species that has been spread to areas outside of its natural range by the actions of humans.
  • Invasive Species: Non-native species that have been shown to cause damage ecologically or economically.
  • IPMS (FWC/Invasive Plant Management Section): A section within the FWC responsible for directing and operating Florida's invasive plant management program.
  • Karst topography: A region underlain by limestone rock and typified by caves, sinkholes, springs, and distinctive water chemistry.
  • Length-Weight: The relationship between length and weight of a fish. This relationship is often used to determine the health or well being of a fish.
  • Lentic: A term used to describe standing water systems like lakes and ponds.
  • Limited Entry: A management control used to reduce fishing pressure and effort by reducing the number of vessels or fishermen in a fishery. Tenoroc is an example.
  • Limnology: The study of freshwater systems.
  • LMB (Largemouth Bass): A highly regarded sport fish belonging to the family Centrarchidae and Genus Micropterus.
  • Lotic: A term used to describe flowing water systems like rivers and streams.
  • Macrophyte: Aquatic plants or algae large enough to be seen by the naked eye.
  • Mark recapture: A method of determining the size of a population, where individuals are collected and marked. The marked individuals are then released and allowed to disperse. A sample is then collected from the population and the ratio of marked individuals versus non-marked individuals is compared.
  • Marketing: Implementing an array of activities designed to ensure that we continually meet our customers' diverse needs and in return are able to accomplish our mission and establish a brand. Classically, marketing involves product, price, placement and promotion, for us it involves the efforts necessary to see Florida recognized as the "Bass Fishing Capital of the World."
  • Maximum size limit: The maximum size of a regulated species that may be harvested.
  • MSY (Maximum Sustainable Yield): The largest average catch that can be harvested continuously (sustained) from a stock during typical environmental conditions that will not destroy a stock's ability to renew itself. Historically used to manage marine commercial fisheries, but not currently used in Florida's fresh waters, compare to Optimum Sustained Use.
  • Media Relations: Developing support and trust with major media (e.g., newspapers, periodicals, radio and television stations, and increasingly with web and social media outlets) to enhance information dissemination via media channels and crisis management.
  • Microwire tags: A small length of wire encoded with a number that is injected into a fish in order to identify the fish in a tagging study.
  • Minimum flow: The minimum water flow rate necessary to prevent harm to an aquatic system.
  • Minimum size limit: The minimum size of a regulated species that may be harvested.
  • Mitigation: Compensation activities required to make up for the alteration of natural resources or habitat pivotal to the survival or well-being of listed species.
  • Monitoring: The systematic measurement of environmental characteristics over an extended period of time to determine the status or trends of some aspect of environmental quality to detect any changes that may occur.
  • Mortality: The rate of death in a population or section of the population. It is often expressed percent loss, loss per unit of time (per day, per year) or a combination of both.
  • Muck: The loose layer of decaying organic matter often found on the bottom of bodies of water with extensive aquatic vegetation.
  • NGO (Non-Government Organizations): Examples in conservation are B.A.S.S., Florida Wildlife Federation, and National Audubon Society.
  • Niche: The position or function of an animal in the community or ecosystem in which it resides.
  • Non-native: Species that do not occur naturally in an area.
  • OBW (FWC/Office of Boating and Waterways): A section of FWC Law Enforcement that manages and promotes use of state waterways for safe and enjoyable boating, oversees and coordinates waterway markers on state waters, provides boating education and boating safety programs, improve boating access and many waterway safety programs.
  • OIT (FWC/Office of Information Technology): An office of FWC that is responsible for developing and implementing information technology for the agency. They provide the agency with: network, computer, internet/intranet web, and telecommunications services.
  • Optimum sustained use: The use of a species that achieves the greatest overall benefits, including economic, social, and biological considerations. Maximum sustainable yield only considers biological and economic benefits. Optimum sustainable use allows less harvest than maximum sustainable yield and typically provides more of a buffer against overharvest ensuring sustainability for future generations. It leaves more fish in the water. The term includes both commercial and recreational use and recognizes the value of catch-and-release and other uses that do not necessarily result in removal of the fish.
  • Outreach: Recruiting and retaining participants by reducing barriers and providing them with the how-to, where-to and confidence to be involved in outdoor activities in a safe and ethical manner that ultimately reflects their stewardship role in conserving fish and wildlife resources. Increasing participation in fishing by reaching out to underrepresented groups (e.g., youth, women, minorities) is an important aspect of outreach.
  • Overfishing: Harvesting at a rate exceeding the rate at which fish can replenish themselves through reproduction.
  • PAC (Percent area covered): A measure of the percentage of the bottom area of a water body with aquatic macrophytes growing on, or over it. Aquatic scientists use PAC to assess the abundance and importance of aquatic plants in a water body.
  • Phase-I fingerlings: In a hatchery, young fry are traditionally placed in ponds that have been prepared and fertilized to have an abundance of zooplankton. Once the zooplankton are consumed, bass fingerlings are typically about one-inch long. At this point, they need more food and hence historically were harvested and stocked in public waters to fend for themselves. Research has shown that relatively few survive if they are placed in waters with existing bass and other predators. Hence Phase-I bass fingerlings are generally used only in new ponds or reservoirs, or other unusual circumstances leading to a near absence of predators.
  • Phase-II fingerlings: Modern hatcheries are now able to produce Phase-II fingerlings that are often 4 to 6 inches long and thus much more capable of avoiding predation and finding a wider diversity of prey. To be cost effective, Phase-II production requires the use of artificial fish feed-something bass fingerlings typically would not accept until some pioneering research by FWC biologists and development of a specifically formulated feed by FWC hatchery biologists and UF scientists. Research is still needed to optimize use of these fish, for instance current work is developing strategies to retrain the bass to hunt and consume live prey and to avoid predation.
  • Phytoplankton: Microscopic plants. A bloom can occur when there are adequate or excess nutrients in the water and abundant sunlight. Like other plants they give off oxygen when there is adequate light for photosynthesis (which allows them to convert energy and grow) but in the dark they use oxygen. Hence, when dark rainy days occur a large bloom can deplete dissolved oxygen from the water and cause a fish kill.
  • Population dynamics: The interactions of recruitment, growth, and mortality that determine the abundance, age structure, and sizes of individuals in a population.
  • Predator: Any organism that exists by preying upon other organisms.
  • Prey: An animal that is a source of food for another animal, esp. by a carnivorous animal.
  • Publications: Generally a one-way flow of information that is part of a communications, marketing, education or outreach effort. Publications typically include all forms of printed information, but generically can also include audio-visual publications, materials published in digital form and the web.
  • PVI (Percent volume inhabited): a measure of useable habitat. In measuring aquatic plants it relates to the amount of the water column that has plants, thus adding a third dimension to Percent Area Covered (PAC).
  • Recruitment: A measure of the number of fish entering a specific phase of a fish stock during a given period (e.g., how many bass survive to be 12" long each year).
  • Relative Weight (Wr): An index of condition calculated by dividing the weight of a fish by a length-specific standard weight for that species.
  • Restoration: Management actions to return a vegetative community or ecosystem to its original, natural condition.
  • RFA (Regional Fisheries Administrator): FWC divides the state into five regions. The DFFM has a regional fisheries administrator in each region that supervises the other freshwater fisheries biologists and interacts with the public, other agency personnel and other agencies on behalf of the Division Director.
  • Riparian: Areas along or adjacent to a river or stream bank whose waters provide soil moisture significantly in excess of that otherwise available through local precipitation. Riparian land owners (either individual or corporate) have an important influence on fisheries management activities and can benefit directly from well-maintained aquatic resources, including rivers, lakes and other water bodies.
  • Sedimentation: The settling out and accumulation of sediments on the bottom of a body of water.
  • Seine: A length of netting (usually 3-10 feet deep) with weights at the bottom and floats at the top that is pulled from both ends through the water to sample fishes.
  • SFR (Federal Aid in Sport Fish Restoration Act): A federal program that provides grant funds to state fish and wildlife agencies for fishery projects, boating access and aquatic education. The program is authorized by the Sport Fish Restoration Act (Dingell-Johnson DJ) of 1950. The SFR Program was created to restore and better manage America's declining fishery resources and was modeled after the successful Wildlife Restoration Program. Through the purchases of fishing equipment, motorboat and small engine fuels and import duties the SFR Program is one of the most successful user pay, user benefit programs.
  • Size structure: The relative number of fish of different sizes in a population.
  • Slot limit: A special size regulation that is placed on certain lakes to improve the fish population. Fish that measure within the protected slot limit must be released immediately, while fish that are either shorter or longer than the protected range may be kept. Slot limits are commonly used to protect large fish, promote harvest of smaller fish and increase growth rates in lakes.
  • Social marketing: The methodical application of marketing along with other concepts and techniques, to achieve specific goals for a social good. A major component is developing community support to create a new social norm (e.g., anti-littering campaigns).
  • Species: Organisms of the same kind that classically interbreed and produce fertile offspring including any subspecies of fish or wildlife or plants, and any distinct population segment of any species or vertebrate fish or wildlife which interbreeds when mature.
  • Species of Special Concern: A species, subspecies, or isolated population of a species or subspecies which is facing a moderate risk of extinction or extirpation from Florida in the future, as determined by the FWC Rule 68A-1004 (27).
  • Standard Weight (Ws): A weight established by a standardized regression calculation of weight on length for a particular species. "Standard weight" equations usually include fish throughout a species' range and are based on a 75th percentile weight rather than average weight in a length-class.
  • Stakeholder: Any person or organization having an interest in the actions discussed or who is/are affected by the resulting outcomes of a project or action.
  • Standing Crop: The total number or weight (biomass) of fish in a water body at a given time.
  • Stock: A managed unit of fish. A stock is based on genetic relationships, geographic distributions, and movement patterns. For instance, the FWC manages largemouth bass as four separate stocks. These stocks are genetically different, and are somewhat geographically separated by water basins.
  • Stocking: Releasing fish into a water body to create a new fish population or, less often, to supplement an existing population. Stocking is most effective in new or renovated waters that do not already contain fish populations. In such waters, stocking a specific ratio of predator to prey fish should result in a balanced population. Stocked fish are usually raised in hatcheries but may also be transplanted from other water bodies.
  • Stewardship: Taking personal responsibility to sustain, and enhance natural resources, while accepting the obligation to the environment and future users.
  • Submersed plants: Aquatic plants that grow completely below the water and are supported by the surrounding water.
  • Subspecies: A group of interbreeding natural populations differing taxonomically and with respect to gene pool characteristics, and often isolated geographically, from other such groups within a biological species.
  • Sunfish: A group of freshwater fishes (Family Centrarchidae) including black bass, black crappie, bluegill, redear sunfish and many others.
  • TAG (Technical Assistance Group): A group of knowledgeable Florida residents representing diverse stakeholder groups affected by the FWC's black bass management decisions.
  • Threatened Species: Any species which is likely to become an endangered species within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. Or as designated by the FWC in Florida, a species, subspecies, or isolated population of a species or subspecies which is facing a very high risk of extinction or extirpation from Florida in the future, as determined by the FWC Rule 68A-1004 (27).
  • TMDLs (Total Maximum Daily Loads): A tool for implementing state water quality standards that is based on the relationship between pollutants and in-stream water quality conditions.
  • Tiered regulations: The tiered system is a current set of regulations that FWC biologists can use to manage a sport fishery. There are three tiers of regulation: Statewide, Quality and High Quality. There are two special tiers for urban ponds. It was developed as a compromise between the desire to manage each lake optimally based on changing conditions and trying to keep rules simple.
  • Trawl: A net with a triangle shaped pocket that is pulled through the water by a boat to collect aquatic organisms. The net opening has a weighted bottom and a float line on the top that help keep the net open while being pulled.
  • Triploid: An animal with three sets of chromosomes rather than the normal two (one from the mother and one from the father). The third set prevents their chromosomes from dividing equally during the production of eggs and sperm, which renders them functionally sterile. This also can cause them to grow faster throughout more of the year since energy isn't diverted to gamete (egg/sperm) production. In the Florida BBMP, this plays a role for special use fisheries where rapid growth is desired but minimizing reproduction (competition for food and energy diversion) is desirable. Moreover, it helps alleviate issues with genetic stocks or artificial selection, since the triploids won't reproduce and adversely affect native basses.
  • Trophic: Refers to the amount of nutrients (fertilizer) and productivity of a system. Hypoeutrophic systems lack nutrients and typically have clear water but relatively few fish. Hypereutrophic systems have too much nutrients tending to cause algae blooms or other excessive plant growth.
  • USFWS (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service): A federal government agency dedicated to the nationwide preservation and management of fish, wildlife, and habitat.
  • Water schedule: An artificial hydroperiod (the temporal pattern of water level fluctuation that occurs naturally with seasonal changes) implemented on impounded waters. Biologically it is important that these mimic natural hydroperiods to which the biota is adapted as much as possible. This is often contrary to the water managers' needs (such as to retain water for potable or irrigation needs during droughts, or conversely to move water away to prevent riparian flooding during wet seasons).
  • WB (Wallop-Breaux): A federal grant fund also known as Federal Aid in Sportfish Restoration (see SFR).
  • Wildlife 2060: A report written by the FWC to inform the general public about changes that may face Florida's fish and wildlife and our own lifestyles if the population of the state doubles. The report is based on projections and analysis by FWC's 2060 team as well as many scientists in the agency. The report can be found at myfwc.com/wildlife2060.
  • WMD (Water Management Districts): There are five regional water management districts that are charged with the responsibility of managing the state's water resources.
  • WSA (Water Supply Areas): Areas that are designated and managed for their ability to recharge the surrounding aquifer, to further protect the state's water supply.
  • Youth fish/hunt programs: Programs or summer camps that introduce youth to the skills of hunting and fishing. These programs are designed to involve youth with community-based outdoor activities in order to strengthen their bond with nature and wildlife.
  • Zooplankton: Microscopic animals that float in the water. They typically feed on phytoplankton (microscopic plants) and are important food for fry and fingerling sunfish.

< Previous | Back To Top | Next >



FWC Facts:
Numerous marine species, like blue crabs, redfish, white shrimp, stingrays, tarpon, are found more than 100 miles upstream in the freshwater portions of the St. Johns River.

Learn More at AskFWC